Tuesday, October 19, 2010

An inspiring blogpost by Jack Livigni

Dear Kashu-do friends,

Occasionally someone writes something that so completely addresses the fundamental and challenging issues that a singer must deal with in becoming an artist.  I am touched and humbled and inspired by the completeness of this wonderful post. I highly recommend that you take the time and read this magnificent post. Jack Livigni is one of those rare singer/teachers who is more dedicated to the art of singing than he is to a mere career. The fight to reclaim the meaningful aspects of this art form we love, to separate the true principles from the business-driven propaganda, has such a powerful ally in Jack.

http://tenortalkblog.com/2010/10/18/the-memory-of-sound-sensation-and-emotion-in-singing/#comment-40

Bravo, bravo, arcibravo, Jack.  You will forgive the baritone quote.  It is the first that came to mind!

JRL

2 comments:

Jack said...

JR, you are so kind! The reaction I have received to this latest post has been weird and humbling - but most of all totally surprising. I really don't know what to say. The stuff I said is just normal stuff... I mean we talk about similar stuff all the time. Perhaps we just all needed to hear it again and be reminded.

Thank you my friend for singling out my post, and hopefully aspiring artists can capture the lessons of these great masters from our past. We really are involved in some of the most deeply instinctual, while simultaneously refined forms of communication aren't we... we are lucky you know... its a humbling privilege.

Hugs
Jack

Jean-Ronald LaFond said...

Dear Jack,

I am not surprised by your humility. It goes with who you are obviously. I used to think that all singers felt similar things, but dedicated artists are not so plentiful as we like to think. The commitment to achieve the very best that we are able to in pursuit of the divine is not one that every working musician or painter or writer aspires to. Not everyone working in the arts is an artist whether they participate in the production thereof or not.

We all want to be paid to be artists, but there are few who see their professional opportunities as a by-product of a daily strive in pursuit of something much greater than the gig, and then there are those who pursue the gig at all cost even sometimes at the expense of art.

Your passion for the art of operatic singing is uncontrovertible. I look forward to greater interaction with you throughout our artistic pursuits.

With sincere admiration,

JR